Exodus

Outline of Exodus
The Nation Delivered and Organized
Introduction, Exodus 1:1-7
I. Israel in Egypt, Exodus 1:8-12:36
1. Oppression, Exodus 1:8-22
2. The Deliverer Raised up and Called, Exodus 2:1-4:31
3. The Plagues and the Passover, Exodus 5:1-12:36
II. From Egypt to Sinai, Exodus 12:37-18:27
1. The Departure, Exodus 12:37-42
2. The Laws of the Passover and of the First-Born, Exodus 12:43-13:22
3. The Passage of the Bed Sea and the Song of Deliverance, Exodus 14:1-15:19
4. Marah, Elim and the Manna, Exodus 15:20-16:36
5. Murmuring; Victory; Jethro’s Visit, Exodus 17:1-18:27
III. Israel at Sinai, Exodus 19:1-40:38
1. The Covenant Proposed and the People Prepared, Exodus 19:1-25
2. The Ten Commandments and Other Laws, Exodus 20:1-23:33
3. Ratification of the Covenant of the Law, Exodus 24:1-11
4. Moses in the Mount; Directions for the Tabernacle, Exodus 24:12-31:18
5. The Golden Calf; Penalty; Moses’ Intercession, Exodus 32:1-33:23
6. Moses Again in the Mount; the Covenant Renewed, Exodus 34:1-35
7. Construction and Erection of the Tabernacle, Exodus 35:1-40:38

Introduction
The word means “going out,” and was given by the Greek translators, as in the case of Genesis.
The book embraces 145 years, and may be divided into three principal parts:
(1) The Deliverance of Israel from Egypt: Exo_1:1-22; Exo_2:1-25; Exo_3:1-22; Exo_4:1-31; Exo_5:1-23; Exo_6:1-30; Exo_7:1-25; Exo_8:1-32; Exo_9:1-35; Exo_10:1-29; Exo_11:1-10; Exo_12:1-36
 (2) The Journey to Sinai: Exo_12:37-51; Exo_13:1-22; Exo_14:1-31; Exo_15:1-27; Exo_16:1-36; Exo_17:1-16; Exo_18:1-27
 (3) The Manifestation of God’s Will for His People, especially in the legislation of Sinai: Exo_19:1-25; Exo_20:1-26; Exo_21:1-36; Exo_22:1-31; Exo_23:1-33; Exo_24:1-18; Exo_25:1-40; Exo_26:1-37; Exo_27:1-21; Exo_28:1-43; Exo_29:1-46; Exo_30:1-38; Exo_31:1-18; Exo_32:1-35; Exo_33:1-23; Exo_34:1-35; Exo_35:1-35; Exo_36:1-38; Exo_37:1-29; Exo_38:1-31; Exo_39:1-43; Exo_40:1-38
 Its authorship by Moses is distinctly asserted by our Lord. See Mar_12:26; Luk_20:37. The parallel between the pilgrimage of the hosts of Israel and the experiences of the soul is obvious and instructive, and we do well to read it with this parallel in mind; but the book is also of the greatest historical importance, and the increasing knowledge of Egyptian customs and of the conditions of life in the Sinaitic peninsula confirm the exactness and accuracy of the narrative. It could only have been written by one who, like Moses, had an intimate acquaintance with both Egypt and the Wilderness.